What exercises can help improve your golf game?

Although golf may not be the most strenuous sport in the world, it helps to be in better shape when playing the game. Being fit has a lot of advantages when it comes to golf. You’re more limber, you have a wider range of motion, and you’re less prone to getting injured. In line with workouts, there are certain exercises that can help improve your golf game as well.

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Image source: hjgt.org

Medicine ball core rotations are great for working out your abdominals and obliques. Strengthening your core gives you a smoother motion and a stronger force when you make a swing while helping you keep a proper posture. You may do this exercise freehand, with a medicine ball, or a set of dumbbells.

Hip flexor with rotations and side bends work your core as well as your legs. This particular exercises stretches the muscles to extend their range of motion. With no weights needed, you can do this anywhere, even before teeing off.

Wood choppers are generally great for baseball, but they can also work well for golf players. This exercise works your shoulders and your obliques. The motion of swinging the pulled weights can be associated with your golf swing. Pulling on the weights requires explosive strength, strength that can build up and help you attempt more powerful swings.

While all these exercises and workout routines are great for golfers, keep in mind that doing warm-ups and stretching is important before playing the game as this helps you avoid injuries.

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Image source: pinterest.com

Hi! I’m Wayne Imber, a retired professor of psychology. With my newfound freedom, I can finally master culinary arts and hone my skills in the kitchen. For more discussions on golf, feel free to visit my blog.

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Benefits of a golf club membership

Avid golfers should consider becoming a member of golf clubs for the many advantages it offers, examples of which are the following:

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Image source: olyclub.com
  • Friendship with people of the same passion: A poll conducted three years ago on new golf club members listed the friendly and welcoming atmosphere as the primary reason for their decision to join. A membership allows people to develop relationships and social camaraderie with fellow golf enthusiasts, not just in the golf course, but also in the clubhouse or other facilities.

  • Unlimited play: Those who love playing nine or 18 rounds regularly will find it more cost-effective to pay the annual membership fee compared to paying every time they go to a golf course. It is easier to improve your golf game when you get to practice for an unlimited amount of time.

  • Opportunity to play in competitions: What better way to gauge your golf skills than to join tournaments, leagues, or interclub matches. By applying for a golf club membership, you can find opportunities to participate in competitions and see where you stack up against other golfers.

  • Other activities: Many golf clubs do not just have courses, but also other amenities, such as fitness rooms, swimming pools, tennis courts, and many more. Usually, these facilities are exclusive only for members.
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Image source: keyroyaleclub.com

Hi, I’m Dr. Wayne Imber, a retired professor who taught social and developmental psychology in many schools in Chicago, Arizona, and Massachusetts. Now, I get to pursue some of my other passions, including playing golf. Read more about the sport by visiting this blog.

Connecting My Two Loves: Psychology And Golf

It was only a matter of time before I started writing about the connection between my two great passions – psychology and golf. For a more cohesive (and perhaps more enjoyable?) discussion, let’s approach this by talking about golf and applying some popular psychology concepts.

The moment

When we say “live in the moment”, this means you should focus on what’s in front of you – the next shot or put. If you made a mistake in the previous hole, don’t dwell on it. Don’t think about the next holes. Just focus on the moment.

Image source: Pixabay.com

The 10-Yard Rule

When you make a mistake or a bad shot, put it in your heard. Scream at yourself for the bad shot in your head. But keep in mind that you’re also walking away from that mistake. Stop venting once you’ve reached 10 yards of where the mistake happened.

Mental endurance

Playing the game under a lot of stress, or too emotionally will take its toll. It can be draining both physically and mentally. Free your mind of any troubles you may think of and simply swing away.

Image source: Pixabay.com

Stay the course

Not all courses are built equally. Some are more challenging than others. When you find yourself at a particularly difficult hole, play through it no matter how many strokes it would take. It does wonders for your mental game if you finally conquer that mountain.

Wayne Imber here. I’m a retired professor of psychology. Subscribe to this LinkedIn page for more on the stuff I love.